Forgive them Father

Often we hear messages about forgiving others. People who have wronged us, people who cut us off in traffic, our ex-partners, our bosses… The list goes on.

However, we go to church, shine our shoes, and walk tall, feeling good that we don’t sin. We don’t offend. When Jesus said, “Now go and sin no more.” we took it to heart, maybe even got a bumper sticker.

We often forget about one small thing, one small scripture that nails Jesus to the cross because of us.

Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.”… – Luke 23:34a (NIV)

No we sit here asking ourselves, ‘Well, what did I do? I don’t hurt anyone!’ but we don’t realise what we do. You may feel like arguing with this point because you are so sure that you’re fine, you’re ok; but I can guarantee without almost 100% certainty that with one question I can make you rethink what this scripture says about you.

Do you have a cell phone?

You’re probably sitting there confused as you respond, ‘Well who doesn’t?’

And this is my point.

Who doesn’t, we need them, they’re a part of everyday life. They keep us connected with the world!

But have you ever sat and thought where your phone comes from? How did it get in your hand? I mean you probably bought it, but how was it made? Where did the parts come from?

Well you’re probably thinking there’s a neat ol’ mine somewhere in Australia, China or the U.S. that provides most of the metal for the parts for your phone, and you’d be right. However, not all of your phone is made from those kinds of metals. One metal that is crucial to the function of your phone is Yttrium.

Yttrium has so many uses, and it’s not just in your phone. It’s in your TV, your camera, and even your cars wheels if they’re alloy.

It sounds great! So useful and everyone needs it in their everyday lives. Except one thing.

It’s not so great.

Although it’s so useful, mining Yttrium is dangerous, extremely dangerous. It piggybacks on highly radioactive material and often miners end up with all sorts of cancers. Not only that but Yttrium destroys the environment when it’s exposed to it, that’s the reason we have so many phone and appliance recycling centers nowadays. Yttrium poisons the environment and kills not just plants and wildlife when it gets dumped but it also affects the people who live near the mines, because the element is so rare, we often sacrifice the safety of workers and residents in order to mine it because it’s so important to so many of us.

But why? Why do we need to endanger people? Why do people have to die so I can stay in touch with my aunt in Norway?

Because of demand.

Because of us.

Many people have not just one phone, but multiple phones. The problem with that is that the only element that can replace Yttrium is… Yttrium. We have to recycle it. Not many of us do though, and not only that but the demand for new phones is higher than the amount of Yttrium that can be recycled.

What this means is that because you want a smartphone. People die.

It sounds heavy, it is.

It’s not the company’s fault, they are responding to our demands.

We demand new things, all of us. We want new stuff all the time; and it is literally killing people.

My point is your shoes may be shiny, you may smile at your neighbours, you may even read your bible daily, or pray with hands raised in church; however, without realising it, you could be causing the death of people on an island you’ve never heard of because you really think the You Version Bible app is nifty.

We are all sinners.

And we need to approach Jesus with a humble heart and an open mind.

– Luke

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